Triadic Data Analysis
Mr. Man-Nok WONG, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong

Delineating patterns within and between triads can deepen our understanding of a variety of group
phenomena and processes. During the talk, I will describe one specific approach to triadic data analysis – Triadic
Relations Model (TRM)- and delineate the basic steps of the analysis. I will then discuss the types of research
questions TRM can address accordingly.
  • Date: Feb 22, Friday
  • Time: 11:00am-12:30pm
  • Venue: E22-2010

Speaker’s Bio:

Mr. Wong is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Management at the Hong Kong Baptist University. His current research focuses on interpersonal processes and newcomer socialization.

Gain or pain: How disability severity moderates the impact of the perceived team climate for inclusion
Dr. Jorge Muniz Jr., State University of Sao Paolo (UNESP), Brazil

Abstract:

The climate for inclusion is encouraged to better manage workplace diversity. However, researchers know little about how the climate for inclusion works in teams consisting of members with a various level of disability severity. Our study from a sample of 497 individuals in 102 teams support that perceived team climate for inclusion fosters team members’ perceived insider status and in turn enhances voice behaviors. However, perceived team climate for inclusion accelerates the felt social anxiety and thus hinders individual performance and voice behaviors for members with a high level of disability severity. But it mitigates the felt social anxiety and in turn enhances individual performance and voice behaviors for members with a low level of disability severity. The implications of this research for the literature on climate for inclusion and workplace disability management are discussed.

  • Date: 20th June (Wednesday)
  • Time: 10:30-12:00
  • Venue: E22-2010

Speaker’s Bio:

Jiping Li earns her Ph.D. degree at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. She is going to be an Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior at Frankfurt School of Finance & Management, Germany, in this coming August. Her research focuses on examining team process and dynamics through the lens of understanding how individuals react to team diversity issue. Her research projects cover topics related to team diversity, relational demography, status, emotions, and work identity.

Doing research in Latin America: Challenges and opportunities
Dr. Jorge Muniz Jr., State University of Sao Paolo (UNESP), Brazil

Abstract:

Emerging economies as a research context have increasingly captured the attention of business and management scholars over the past decade and novel models and concepts have been developed as a result. However, due to their unique and somehow peculiar institutional conditions, researchers encounter many difficulties when conducting empirical research in those emerging economies. Using Brazil as an illustrative example, Dr. Muniz will highlight the main challenges and local resource supports that are available to foreign researchers and postgraduate students.

  • Date: 11th May (Friday)
  • Time: 11:00-12:00
  • Venue: E22-1003

Speaker’s Bio:

Jorge Muniz Jr. is Associate Professor in the Universidade Estadual Paulista – (UNESP), Sao Paulo, Brazil, Editor-in-Chief of The Production Journal, and coordinator of Executive Master in Production Engineering. He completed his Doctorate (Operation Management) from UNESP awarded by Production Engineering Brazilian Association (ABEPRO), and M.S. (Operation Management) from USP, Brazil. Additionally, he has worked in Ford as Quality Manager for Integrating Lean Thinking to the Quality Operations Systems. He researches knowledge management in production systems, quality management and lean thinking.

Lone Ranger or Team Player? The Impact of Anxiety on Teamwork Orientation
Dr. Edward Qing Lu, Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Abstract:

Although anxiety is frequently observed in the workplace, the relationship between individuals’ anxiety and their teamwork orientation has not been empirically investigated. Drawing on past research on the intrapersonal and interpersonal consequences of anxiety, we posit that the effect of anxiety on individuals’ teamwork orientation may depend on which types of motives (social belongingness vs. personal control) are triggered by anxiety. One field study and two experiments revealed that anxiety induces both the motives of social belongingness and personal control, subsequently the motive of social belongingness increases teamwork orientation whereas the motive of personal control decreases it. Furthermore, we found that self-esteem strengthens the impact of social belongingness motive and weakens the impact of personal control motive for anxious individuals. Theoretical and practical implications of our research are discussed.

  • Date: 9th March 2018 (Friday)
  • Time: 15:00-16:30
  • Venue: E22-2013

Speaker’s Bio:

Dr. Qing Lu received his PhD in Human Resource Management and Organizational Behavior at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University in 2016 and is working there as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow. During the past years, he has developed deep interests in four major areas: Cross-Cultural Psychology, Person-Situation Congruence, Workplace Emotions, and Compensation. His work has been published in Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and he also has several coauthored papers that are currently under R&R at such outlets as Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Psychological Science. Dr. Qing Lu is a long-distance runner and scuba diving lover. He is always ready to chat and collaborate.

Judgment and Decision Making under Social Scrutiny
Mr. Si Kao, Chinese University of Hong Kong

Abstract:

In a series of studies I investigate people’s judgment and decision making in response to cues of social presence. In one project, I study how people make decisions regarding resource allocation between their friends and unacquainted others in interpersonal contexts. I show that driven by a motive to signal the (socially rewarding) quality of being fair, people could disadvantage their friends relative to unacquainted others in resource allocations. In another project, I study how publicity influences people’s judgment of the behaviors of others. I show that when people conduct behaviors that appear negative to others, publicity can instigate the others to engage in causal analyses that strive to justify the behaviors in a more positive light. That is, social perceivers evaluate others’ seemingly negative behaviors more favorably when the behaviors are done in public than in private.

  • Date: 5th February 2018 (Monday)
  • Time: 11:00-12:30
  • Venue: E22-2010

Speaker’s Bio:

Mr. Si Kao is currently a doctoral candidate at the Department of Marketing, the Chinese University of Hong Kong. His research focuses on judgment and decision making and consumer behavior, and has been published in both marketing and psychology journals. He was the winner of the 2016 CUHK Postgraduate Research Output Award. Mr. Si Kao earned an M.Phil degree from the Hong Kong Polytechnic University and a bachelor degree from University of Macau.

Explaining inconsistencies in implicit and explicit attitudes towards domestic and foreign products
Dr. Ting-Hsiang Tseng, Associate Professor of Department of International Business at Feng Chia University

Abstract:

Extant research indicates that many consumers around the world tend to favour domestic products over foreign products. Scholars use different terms such as ‘“domestic country bias”’ (DCB) or ‘“home country bias”’ to describe this phenomenon. DCB seems to vary by depending on whether the attitudes measured are implicit or explicit. In general, country, product, and variation in attitude types pose problems for the generalizsability of theories on consumers’ preferences for domestic and foreign products. This talk attempts to understand such variations of DCB and proposes that the categorical concept of typicality may provide a solution to this issue. The talk also examines how typicality can explain inconsistencies in primed (through ‘“buy-local”’ ads) attitudes.

  • Date: 20th January 2018 (Saturday)
  • Time: 11:30-12:30
  • Venue: E22-2010

Speaker’s Bio:

Dr. Ting-Hsiang Tseng is Associate Professor of Department of International Business at Feng Chia University (FCU). Dr. Tseng received his doctoral degree from Cass Business School in City University London, UK. He had been the directors of several international programs in FCU. He focuses on services marketing, international marketing, and relationship marketing, and publishes on International Marketing Review, Journal of Services Marketing, Journal of Business Research, International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, Computers in Human Behavior, International Business Research, Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, and so on. He was awarded the excellent student mentor of FCU in 2013, the excellent teacher of FCU in 2017, and the excellent research fellowship of Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) of Taiwan in 2016 and 2017. Before the academic position, he was an assistant to Chairman of China Shipbuilding Corporation and a production planning engineer in United Microelectronics Corporation (UMC).

Disagree in disagreement: How does conflict asymmetry affect team outcomes?
Prof. Zhijun Chen, Shanghai University of Finance and Economics

Abstract:

The mainstream of the conflict literature has predominantly focused on the mean levels of team members’ conflict perceptions. Yet, theory and recent research suggest that it is also important to consider how the dispersion of these conflict perceptions, or “conflict asymmetry”, might affect team outcomes. During the talk, I will describe one study how my co-authors and I model the effect of conflict asymmetry on team performance outcomes. Drawing on the shared reality theory, we contend that a high level of conflict asymmetry indicates a lack of consensus among team members about the reality of their teamwork, causing them unable to coordinate their interests and efforts. As such, team members will display more political behavior toward each other, which then leads to poor team outcomes (performance and innovation). Data of 68 functional teams supported our hypotheses about relationship conflict asymmetry. Relationship conflict asymmetry reduced team task performance and innovation via members’ intra-team political behavior. Moreover, team political climate strengthened the association between relationship conflict asymmetry and members’ intra-team political behavior. In contrast, task conflict asymmetry thwarted team task performance directly only when team political climate was high rather than low. I will then discuss the implications of these findings accordingly.

  • Date: 3rd November 2017
  • Time: 14:30-16:00
  • Venue: E22-3010

Speaker’s Bio:

Zhijun Chen is a Professor at the School of International Business Administration at the Shanghai University of Finance and Economics. He obtained his Ph.D. from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology in 2011, and has worked at the Business School of the University of Western Australia for three years. Zhijun is interested in studying employee proactive behaviour, team members’ mutual influence, and different forms of leadership styles. His work has been published at the Journal of Applied Psychology, Organization Science, Personnel Psychology, and Journal of Organizational Behavior.

The dynamic interplay of contracts and trust: Untangling between- and within-dyad effects
Dr. Liwen Wang, University of Hong Kong

Abstract:

By differentiating between- from within-dyad effects, this study argues that when comparing between buyer–supplier dyads, contracts and trust complement each other, reflecting varying levels of exchange complexity; but in within-dyad comparisons, contracts and trust substitute for each other over time, due to partner-specific learning. To validate these arguments, the authors examine boundary conditions at the exchange level, namely, exchange product customization and prior exchange history. Product customization reduces the complementary between-dyad effects of trust and contracts; exchange history makes the within-dyad substitution effects more salient. The results, based on survey data from 250 buyer–supplier relationships collected over two time periods, provide strong support for the propositions and thereby establish a more refined understanding of the dynamic contract–trust relationship.

  • Date: 11th October 2017
  • Time: 15:00-16:30
  • Venue: E22-2010

Speaker’s Bio:

Dr. Liwen Wang is a post-doctoral research fellow in School of Business, the University of Hong Kong. She earned her Ph.D. from the University of Oxford. Her current research focuses on innovation and the governance of inter-organizational relationships in emerging markets. Her work has appeared in the Journal of Business Research.

Customer misbehavior and store managers’ work-to-family enrichment: The moderated mediation effect of work meaningfulness and organizational affective commitment
Prof. Raymond Loi, University of Macau

Abstract:

With the growing research interest in work-family enrichment, this study explores how negative workplace phenomenon affects store managers’ experience of work-to-family enrichment. Using two-wave survey data collected from 156 retail store managers who had frequent interactions with customers, we found that customer misbehavior had a negative effect on their work-to-family enrichment through work meaningfulness. Furthermore, store managers’ organizational affective commitment acted as an effective buffer on such negative relationship. Our findings thus fill in one missing piece in the current work-family enrichment literature and carry important implications for organizations to help retail store managers attain work meaningfulness and enrich their family life.

  • Date: 27th September 2017
  • Time: 14:30-16:00
  • Venue: E22-2010

Price Promotions and Consumption Experience
Dr. Leonard Lee, National University of Singapore

Abstract:

The impact of price promotions has attracted substantial interest among scholars who seek to understand how people make everyday purchase decisions. While past research has shown that price promotions often translate into real economic savings, guide buying decisions, encourage trial of new products, and make consumers feel smart and good about themselves, other work has shown that price promotions can reduce perceived product efficacy, lower price expectations, increase price sensitivity, and negatively impact brand sales and consumer loyalty in the long run. In this session, I discuss findings from two recent projects that highlight additional potential downsides of price promotions, particularly with regard to consumption experience, and their respective psychological mechanisms. Specifically, price promotions may decrease consumption enjoyment particularly when people consume the products that they have purchased at a discount after a delay (vs. immediately) following the transaction, as well as increase consumer impatience by invoking greater reward-seeking motivation.

  • Date: 19th July 2017
  • Time: 14:30-16:00
  • Venue: E22-2010

Why abusive supervision impacts employee ocb and cwb? A meta-analytic review of competing mediating mechanisms
Prof. Muammer Ozer, City University of Hong Kong

Abstract:

Organizational studies have employed several theories to explain the dysfunctional effects of abusive supervision on employee contextual performance, including OCBs and CWBs. Despite such improvement, prior studies have not provided a comprehensive picture of why abusive supervision influences employee contextual performance and which mechanism matters more for OCBs and CWBs, respectively. Our research conducted a meta-analytic review and incorporated both justice and resource perspectives, two most salient theoretical explanations, to test their specific mediating roles. Using meta-analytic structural equation modeling (MASEM),the results based on 607 studies (N = 139,481) indicated that organizational justice mediated the relationship between abusive supervision and OCBs, while work stress transmitted the influences of abusive supervision on both OCBs and CWBs. In addition, the results also revealed that abusive supervision influenced OCBs and CWBs through two distinct mechanisms. Specifically, justice perspective accounted more for the effect of abusive supervision on OCBs, while resource perspective accounted more for the impact of abusive supervision on CWBs. Our meta-analysis offers a thorough review and deepens the understanding of how abusive supervision influences employee contextual performance. Implications and directions for future research are also discussed.

  • Date: 5th April, 2017
  • Time: 15:00-16:30
  • Venue: E22-3014

Speaker’s Bio:

Dr. Zhang was attracted to be a scholar when he started undergraduate study in Sichuan University. He was introduced to research in 2010 at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) when He enrolled in Ph.D. to pursue his fascination with Management. Over the four years in UNSW, he was initiated into ethnography, meta-analysis and survey research by examining how employees react to managers’ mistreatments. Shortly after he graduated, he joined Research Institute of Economics and Management, Southwestern University of Finance and Economics as an Associate Professor. Dr. Zhang has published papers in Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Journal of Business Ethics, Tourism Management, The International Journal of Human Resource Management and Health Policy and Planning.

Teaching in business schools
Prof. Muammer Ozer, City University of Hong Kong

Abstract:

With the globalization of business, more and more students prefer to study business and management (Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA)). Even those people who have their undergraduate degrees in non-business fields, such arts and sciences, education, engineering, medicine, law, literature, and science, feel the need to study business and management if they want to move up to more managerial positions in their organizations Master of Business Administration (MBA) or Doctor of Business Administration (DBA)). Compared to undergraduate business (BBA) students, professional business (MBA or DBA) students have long work experiences, bring into the classroom those experiences, and, at the same time, expect knowledge that they can use in their organizations the next day. This paper focusses on how to teach business students more effectively. Based on a 20-year longitudinal ethnographic study in one of the major business schools in Asia, I identify key aspects of teaching content and delivery in business education and highlight how one can overcome the challenges of educating business students.

  • Date: 4th November 2016
  • Time: 16:00-17:00
  • Venue: E22-2010

Speaker’s Bio:

Professor Muammer Ozer is Director of Doctor of Business Administration program (DBA) in the College of Business (CB) of the City University of Hong Kong (CityU). The DBA program is one of the most prestigious and recognized DBA programs in the world and is designed for senior executives who are interested in engaging in rigorous business research with practical and societal impacts.

He is a professor of management. He holds BS and MS degrees in Engineering from the Istanbul Technical University, an MBA degree from the Saint Louis University and a Ph.D. degree in Business Administration from the University of Pittsburgh. He is also a graduate of an executive education program of Harvard Business School.

His research focuses on the strategies, behaviors, and performance of individuals, teams, and firms within the context of innovation and technology management, information technology, and international business. He was the editor of a highly acclaimed special journal issue about New Product Development in Asia. His research publications have appeared in such leading international journals as Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Product Innovation Management, Research Policy, and Strategic Management Journal, among many others. His research on the role of the Internet in new product development has been considered to be a “pioneering” work in the research community. He has been an editorial board member and an ad hoc reviewer for leading international journals as well as a pre-publication book reviewer for major publishing companies.

He is the winner of the 2015 City University of Hong Kong Teaching Excellence Award. He is also the winner of the 2009 City University of Hong Kong College of Business Research Excellence Award as well as the 2012 City University of Hong Kong College of Business Teaching Excellence Award. This makes him the first and the only person at the City University of Hong Kong and the College of Business to receive both of these awards. He is also the recipient of numerous research grants from various prominent institutions such as the Institute for Industrial Competitiveness and the Jagdish Sheth Foundation.