Prof. Tingting CHEN
Associate Professor
Lingnan University of Hong Kong

Date: 04 December, 2019 (Wednesday)
Time: 10:30~11:30
Venue: E22-2010


Abstract

Drawing on the cultural learning perspective of gossip and social learning theory, we propose that supervisor negative gossip is positively related to employee receiver job performance through reflective learning. We conducted two field studies to test our hypotheses. Based on a cross-sectional design with 212 supervisor–subordinate dyads, Study 1 found that supervisor negative gossip facilitated employee receiver reflective learning, which then improved their job performance. This mediating effect was positive and significant after controlling for supervisor positive gossip, supervisor positive feedback, and supervisor negative feedback as independent variables, as well as norm acceptance as a mediator. Moreover, based on a cross-lagged panel design with 132 supervisor–subordinate dyads, Study 2 replicated the findings obtained in Study 1. Importantly, it provided evidence for the directional relationship from supervisor negative gossip to employee receiver job performance via reflective learning. Our research extends the nomological network of workplace gossip by exploring the positive effects of workplace negative gossip on gossip receivers from a learning perspective.

Biography

Prof. Chen is an Associate Professor in the Department of Management of Lingnan University. She received her Ph.D. from City University of Hong Kong. Her research interests include creative and innovative performance at the individual and team levels, high-velocity environments and team dynamics, and leadership theories. Tingting has published in internationally leading journals in the academic fields of organizational behavior, human resource management, and management education such as Personnel Psychology, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Human Resource Management, and Academy of Management Learning & Education.

Prof. Zhijun CHEN
Academic Director of MBA program
Head of the Department of Human Resources Management
Shanghai University of Finance & Economics

Date: 03 December, 2019 (Tuesday)
Time: 11:00~12:00
Venue: E22-2010


Abstract

Ever since Taylor proposed the idea of science management, theories and studies about how to design jobs have proliferated in the field of organizational behavior. Within this body of literature, classical perspectives are predominantly rooted in a motivational paradigm and focus on issues like how to balance job demands with available resources. A recent example is the relational work design perspective, which also emerges from this motivational paradigm. Meanwhile, findings across a number of research streams have suggested that job characteristics can have implications beyond individual motivation, which pertain to a self-learning perspective of work design effects. We build upon this self-learning perspective to study how one job characteristics, required creativity at work, determines individual well-being such as life satisfaction. Findings from two field studies and one scenario manipulation largely supported the self-learning perspective.

Biography

Zhijun Chen is the Academic Director of the MBA program and Head of the Department of Human Resources Management at College of Business at the Shanghai University of Finance and Economics (SUFE) and a professor of the department. He is also an honorary research fellow of the University of Western Australia. Currently, Zhijun is an Associate Editor of the Human Relations and the Rep-at-large for International Association of Chinese Management Research. He sits in the editorial review board of internationally leading journals such as Asian Pacific Journal of Management and Journal of Business Research. Zhijun is interested in studying employee proactive behavior, coworker influence, and different forms of leadership styles. His work has been published at the Journal of Applied Psychology, Organization Science, Personnel Psychology, Journal of Management, and Journal of Organizational Behavior. He teaches courses such as organizational behavior, strategic human resources management and social psychology for different levels of students.

Prof. Huang XU
Professor of Management
Associate Dean for School of Business
Head of Department of Management
Hong Kong Baptist University

Date: 21 November, 2019 (Thursday)
Time: 16:30~18:00
Venue: E22-2010


Abstract

In a series of studies, we attempted to extend the idea of “absolute power corrupts absolutely” by demonstrating that leaders with relatively absolute power are more likely to exhibit inconsistent and contradictory behaviors. In this seminar, I will present two papers published recently by my colleagues and I to show that individuals in power are more likely to be caught up in a paradox of dominating and empowering their followers. In the first paper, based on three samples, we showed that managers tend to react paradoxically to employees’ voicing behavior. They tend to give lower performance evaluations to employees who engage in very low and very high frequency of prohibitive voice than to those whose voice frequency is moderate, especially for employees with a lower level of LMX. In the second paper, we unveiled a similar paradox of domination and empowerment in the context of power succession. Based a historical dataset (power succession in early Chinese kingdoms, 403 BC – 959 AD) and two samples of contemporary firms, we showed, at least in some situations, that parent-incumbents tend to exert coercive control over their child-successors, when they regard their child-successors as being very unwilling/incapability or very willing/capable to take over the throne. In the last part of my presentation, I will share with the audience about the great lessons we learned from the review processes. 

Biography

Professor Huang Xu is a Professor of management, the Associate Dean for School of Business and Head of Department of Management in Hong Kong Baptist University. He received his PhD in Organizational Psychology from University of Groningen (The Netherlands). His areas of research expertise include leadership, power, proactive and abnormal work behavior, employee well-being, cross-cultural psychology, and management issues in China. His research has been widely published in top management journals such as Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Management, Journal of Applied Psychology and Journal of Organizational Behavior. He currently serves as the senior editor of Asia Pacific Journal of Management and is also the member of editorial board of Academy of Management Journal, Management and Organization Review, Human Relations and Australian Management Journal. Besides his significant academic impact and contribution, he is also actively involved in teaching in Hong Kong-RPg courses and is the chief supervisor of PhD students and Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) students in Hong Kong Baptist University.

Prof. Yixia SUN
Assistant Professor of Marketing
School of Management at Zhejiang University

Date: 18 November, 2019 (Monday)
Time: 15:00~16:00
Venue: E22-2010


Abstract

The current research investigates dehumanization as a way consumers manage feelings of embarrassment experienced in retail and service contexts. The results of seven experimental studies (three in a field setting and four conducted online) provide converging evidence that when consumers buy embarrassing products or require an embarrassing medical service, they dehumanize the service provider. Specifically, when in an embarrassing service interaction, consumers engage in mechanistic dehumanization, perceiving service providers as more mechanistic and less capable of deliberate thoughts and emotional reactions than when in a non-embarrassing service interaction. The studies also show that when faced with embarrassing retail or service situations, consumers prefer service providers who show a mechanistic demeanor over those who are chatty and looking to build rapport. These findings extend the dehumanization literature by providing an example of a subtle, everyday form of mechanistic dehumanization, and contribute to the research on embarrassment by identifying a unique way that consumers manage their feelings of embarrassment in retail and service encounters.

Biography

Professor Yixia SUN is an assistant professor of marketing in the School of Management at Zhejiang University. Prof Sun received her PhD in marketing from the Chinese University of Hong Kong. She is known for her innovative research in how dehumanization affects consumer behaviors and marketing.

Contact

Ms. Michelle Lai San KUAN
Secretary of Department of Management and Marketing
Office: E22-2072
Tel: (853) 8822 4649
Email: michellekuan@um.edu.mo